Detecting Plagiarism

Hello All and Welcome to 2019!

It’s not enough for a teacher to rely on a plagiarism checker. They need to have a working knowledge of plagiarism and what constitutes committing plagiarism. This knowledge, of course, should be share with their students throughout the year (not just at the beginning!). With that in mind, as we start the new year, I wanted to give a couple of sources that review warning signs for plagiarism. This article by teachthought.com lists the signs of plagiarism that every teacher should know. Another from MIT lists warning signs and “the enemy” of academic integrity.

Share these sites with your students as you go over your plagiarism policies at the start of a new calendar year. Let them know that they won’t be able to get away with plagiarism so easily. That’s the way to create a temptation free classroom!

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On Plagiarism: One Educator’s Perspective

Check out this insightful article by an educator who deals with student plagiarism: Plagiarism: To Steal or Not To Steal. Of particular note is the author’s recognition of student’s not setting out to plagiarize (see “Accidental Plagiarism”) as well as the importance of teacher’s modelling good reading skills (which she terms “curiosity”) in the classroom to dissuade student’s from plagiarizing and become original writers who think critically.

Teachers Should Practice What They Preach!

“Not only do we hold students accountable for monitoring their own behavior, but we also teach them to demonstrate courage in re- porting the unethical behavior of their peers. As professionals and adult models, we must expect as much of ourselves.”

How do we teach students about plagiarism and how to avoid it. One simple way–we model anti-plagiarism behavior in our own personal and professional lives. Check out this article: Plagiarism Isn’t Just an Issue for Students. In the article, the author makes an argument that teachers should model anti-plagiarism behavior. This is an important step in teaching students about plagiarism issues.  The article is a sober reminder that we, as teachers, should always practice what we preach.

(Credit to Allen Chase for passing on the article to me. To other subscribers, please send any interesting plagiarism info you find for possible publication on the website.)

Plagiarism Resource: Hosting Facts

Teachers (and other academic integrity enthusiasts!),

Here’s a helpful source : hosting facts.

It’s another great site with lots of plagiarism education and detection tools. Of special note is the way the site helps to distinguish between plagiarism and copyright infringement, involves an infographic with a timeline of U.S. copyright history, and covers some of the major free online tools for detecting plagiarism.

Check it out!

 

Creating Lessons that Discourage Plagiarism

One of the best things a teacher can do is to create a classroom environment that discourages AND DECREASES the temptation to commit plagiarism. Using plagiarism checking software is a must (just like a police officers presence decreases speeding on the road), but anti-plagiarism friendly assignments also are great. They turn your classroom into an anti-plagiarism environment while at the same time promoting creative and original thinking. Win-win!

Here’s a helpful link from MIT’s Comparative Media Studies and Writing department that offers teachers suggestions about how to create assignments that decrease the temptation to cheat: Resources for Teachers: How to Prevent Plagiarism

Good luck on the new school year!