Creative Commons and Google Advanced Image Search: Finding Reusable Media

This week, my students began working on a larger film project. They wanted to bring in images, video, and music from outside sources. I told them that they cold do that, but they would need to get permission or find open sources. Very few knew how to do this. If you face, this problem. Here’s a couple of sources.

  1. Creative Commons (https://search.creativecommons.org): CC is a great site that allows a searches on a number of search engines including (among others) Youtube (video), Flickr (images), Google Images, Wikipedia Commons, and many more. You can find images, video, and music which can be reused and even modified.
  2. Advanced Search Option on Google: On google.com, go to the settings tab (in the bottom right corner of the screen). Click on the advanced search option. This option allows you to find material on google that can be reused responsibly.

A huge majority of student plagiarism cases deal with images (and they don’t even know it’s plagiarism). Check out several posts on this site dealing with this issue. To avoid these cases, use these websites to help students find sources they can use and not violate copyrights.

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Powerpoint Presentation: Originality vs. Innovation

So, I created this presentation for a PD session I did in an attempt to provide an example for plagiarism education. I encouraged the teachers in the session to see it as an example of how to teach students about the issues around plagiarism.

ib-plagiarism-presentaiton

Check it out.

New York Times Plagiarism Education

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Here’s a great website I found care of “The Learning Network” from The New York Times:New York Times Learning Network: Plagiarism Education

The site has all sorts of lesson plans, tools, tips, videos, and more that can help you instruct your students about plagiarism. As they put it, “The middle and high school years are an opportunity to shape healthy attitudes in a lower-stakes environment. But for many students, poor habits are formed ahead of college.” This website can help you instruct your middle school and high school students in the good habits of avoiding plagiarism.

What is Original?

A great, great, great discussion about originality in the world today (music, fashion, technology, etc.) from the folks at TED.

Of particular importance is how (or if) originality can be achieved in today’s world. My view is that students need to learn how to use prior sources and ideas to build upon. That is their original contribution.

Here’s the podcast: What is Original?

“The Ultimate Guide to Copyright [and Plagiarism] for Students”

This week, one of the creators of WhoIsHostingThis.com reached out to me with their great resource for Plagiarism Education.

WhoIsHostingThis is a free tool that allows anyone to see who hosts a particular website. One of the most common uses of the tool is in the course of investigating plagiarism and/or copyright infringement.

The website is really detailed and offers great info and videos to share with your students. Check it out in the link below.

WhoIsHostingThis Copyright and Plagiarism Guide

Three Resources to Bring FUN to Plagiarism Education

This month, I wanted to highlight three great resources that add some fun to your plagiarism teachingAcadiau University Plagiarism Tutorial. It’s hard to get students to have fun learning about how to avoid plagiarism, but these resources might do the trick. Check them out!

  • Acadiau University Plagiarism Tutorial

A fun way to learn about plagiarism, citing, etc.

http://library.acadiau.ca/sites/default/files/library/tutorials/plagiarism/

 

  • Lycoming University Plagiarism Game

A Plagiarism Game where students can have fun learning about how to avoid plagiarism

http://www.lycoming.edu/library/instruction/tutorials/plagiarismGame.aspx

 

  • Plagiarism Video from EasyBib

A great video that succinctly covers the ins-and-outs of plagiarism.