What Parents Need to Know About Plagiarism

Any teacher will tell you that it is a good idea to get parents working with you rather than against you as their child’s teacher. This post from the Washington Post explores what parents should know about plagiarism. This blog has explored a myriad of issues concerning student plagiarism–how to instruct about, how to help prevent or limit, how to deal with student cases, how to create temptation free classrooms, how to train fellow teachers, etc.–but how to help parents understand the issues hasn’t been covered. Please read the article and think about ways a teacher can help parents understand the gravity of plagiarism and how to help their student understand and avoid it in their work.

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Unplag Shout Out!

 

This past month, I got an email from Anastasia at Unplag.com. Her company has a free plagiarism checker that I used this month. It works really well. This is Anastasia’s email which describes her company and its purpose. Check out unplag for a great free tool.

     “Here, at Unplag, we strive to develop students’ creative thinking. That is why we regularly create interesting materials and resources on plagiarism topic both for teachers and students.
     Recently we launched a free plagiarism checker for academic writers: https://unplag.com/free-plagiarism-checker. It can find plagiarism in texts written in English, German, Spanish, French and a few other languages.
    Besides, we take our knowledge into a plagiarism guide – an instructive guidebook that has inside essentials of literacy on plagiarism topic. It can be found here: https://unplag.com/materials/free-plagiarism-guide/book.pdf.
     [This] is not a comprehensive list of things we create, we also like to run different activities to make students aware of plagiarism threats and simplify the teachers’ job . . .
we want to build a good relationship with educators and bloggers who share our values on plagiarism topic.”
Thanks, Anastasia!

Plagiarism Resources for the International Baccalaureate

Many of the teachers that come to this site teach in an International Baccalaureate (or IB) school. The IB has rigorous academic honesty policies for their classes. For example, all IB teachers must sign off on the originality of each of their students work. For this post, I have collected a couple of IB resources that discuss effective practices and principles to utilize in your classrooms to encourage academic honesty. By no means are these documents limited to IB teachers, all teachers should find them useful.

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New York Times Plagiarism Education

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Here’s a great website I found care of “The Learning Network” from The New York Times:New York Times Learning Network: Plagiarism Education

The site has all sorts of lesson plans, tools, tips, videos, and more that can help you instruct your students about plagiarism. As they put it, “The middle and high school years are an opportunity to shape healthy attitudes in a lower-stakes environment. But for many students, poor habits are formed ahead of college.” This website can help you instruct your middle school and high school students in the good habits of avoiding plagiarism.

What is Original?

A great, great, great discussion about originality in the world today (music, fashion, technology, etc.) from the folks at TED.

Of particular importance is how (or if) originality can be achieved in today’s world. My view is that students need to learn how to use prior sources and ideas to build upon. That is their original contribution.

Here’s the podcast: What is Original?