Plagiarism Flow Chart

Check out this handy dandy plagiarism flow chart. I used it in class recently. It definitely helped my students thinking about when to cite and avoiding any plagiarism issues in their work. The chart is from a really good site on plagiarism and the IB Extended Essay.

 

Plagiarism.Org

Here’s a great site that includes all sorts of information (similar to this one!) for teachers. I especially like their videos. There’s lots to explore, but what I’ve found so far is that most the videos are for educators, specifically, how to educate students about plagiarism. Check it out and let me know what you think.

Mid-Year Reinforcement: Plagiarism Tutorial and Test by Indiana University

Here is a great resource from Indiana University. The website provides tutorials and practice tests that students can independently complete that teaches them about plagiarism issues and how to avoid it. At the end, there’s a test that they can complete that gives evidence of their training and new knowledge.

I really like this site because it allows students practice before providing proof of plagiarism training (in the form of a passed test). I had my students complete the test and placed the results in their file. That way, no student can claim ignorance about plagiarism. Completing this website along with the Harvard Plagiarism training at the beginning of the year gives a nice beginning and mid-year training program.

Multilingual Plagiarism Checker

Okay, so here’s a new issue that I encountered this week. I had a student write an extended essay (IB Thesis) in Chinese as per requirements. We had a problem utilizing existing plagiarism software to check for originality. How can I check a non-English paper for plagiarism? I couldn’t be the only one who has encountered this problem.

After a little bit of research, I found my answer. Check out this resource. Plagramme.com is a multi-lingual plagiarism checker where teachers can upload papers in a number of languages and check for plagiarism.

If you have the same problem as me, use this website. It works great.

 

 

Harvard University Guide to Using Sources

Harvard has had its fair share of plagiarism cases (see Harvard Student Commits Plagiarism Loses Book Deal). In the last few years, the Harvard College Writing Program has focused on decreasing student plagiarism through student education. The Harvard Guide to Using Sources is the fruit of that effort. It is a one-stop website for tips on avoiding plagiarism, proper citation methods, using and evaluating sources, and many other helpful tips to use to avoid plagiarism.

Along with this great resource, they have developed two online quizzes that help students consider plagiarism scenarios. Quiz 1, Using Sources, Five Scenarios, helps students “work through examples based, in part, on real academic honesty cases. Upon [completion] of the tutorial, [the student] will be acquainted with the most common misunderstandings about academic integrity, and will know more about how to integrate sources responsibly into your writing” (Guide Website). Quiz 2, Using Sources, Five Examples, is “based on passages from real student essays, and illustrates problems with summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting sources. By taking the tutorial, [the student] will gain a deeper understanding of the most common forms of plagiarism and a solid sense of how to use sources effectively” (Guide Website).

At the beginning of each quiz, the student can enter an email address and have the results sent to that address. So, a teacher can request students email their results directly or require a screen shot of their results to ensure student completion.

This resources is a great resource for teachers who wish to introduce plagiarism issues to their students and then check understanding through the online quizzes.