Multilingual Plagiarism Checker

Okay, so here’s a new issue that I encountered this week. I had a student write an extended essay (IB Thesis) in Chinese as per requirements. We had a problem utilizing existing plagiarism software to check for originality. How can I check a non-English paper for plagiarism? I couldn’t be the only one who has encountered this problem.

After a little bit of research, I found my answer. Check out this resource. Plagramme.com is a multi-lingual plagiarism checker where teachers can upload papers in a number of languages and check for plagiarism.

If you have the same problem as me, use this website. It works great.

 

 

Advertisements

University of Oxford on Plagiarism

Here is a great page from the University of Oxford on plagiarism. It’s mainly informational, but it does a great job of succinctly describing plagiarism, types of plagiarism, and how to avoid it. One more tool/example for teachers.

Harvard University Guide to Using Sources

Harvard has had its fair share of plagiarism cases (see Harvard Student Commits Plagiarism Loses Book Deal). In the last few years, the Harvard College Writing Program has focused on decreasing student plagiarism through student education. The Harvard Guide to Using Sources is the fruit of that effort. It is a one-stop website for tips on avoiding plagiarism, proper citation methods, using and evaluating sources, and many other helpful tips to use to avoid plagiarism.

Along with this great resource, they have developed two online quizzes that help students consider plagiarism scenarios. Quiz 1, Using Sources, Five Scenarios, helps students “work through examples based, in part, on real academic honesty cases. Upon [completion] of the tutorial, [the student] will be acquainted with the most common misunderstandings about academic integrity, and will know more about how to integrate sources responsibly into your writing” (Guide Website). Quiz 2, Using Sources, Five Examples, is “based on passages from real student essays, and illustrates problems with summarizing, paraphrasing, and quoting sources. By taking the tutorial, [the student] will gain a deeper understanding of the most common forms of plagiarism and a solid sense of how to use sources effectively” (Guide Website).

At the beginning of each quiz, the student can enter an email address and have the results sent to that address. So, a teacher can request students email their results directly or require a screen shot of their results to ensure student completion.

This resources is a great resource for teachers who wish to introduce plagiarism issues to their students and then check understanding through the online quizzes.

Creative Commons and Google Advanced Image Search: Finding Reusable Media

This week, my students began working on a larger film project. They wanted to bring in images, video, and music from outside sources. I told them that they cold do that, but they would need to get permission or find open sources. Very few knew how to do this. If you face, this problem. Here’s a couple of sources.

  1. Creative Commons (https://search.creativecommons.org): CC is a great site that allows a searches on a number of search engines including (among others) Youtube (video), Flickr (images), Google Images, Wikipedia Commons, and many more. You can find images, video, and music which can be reused and even modified.
  2. Advanced Search Option on Google: On google.com, go to the settings tab (in the bottom right corner of the screen). Click on the advanced search option. This option allows you to find material on google that can be reused responsibly.

A huge majority of student plagiarism cases deal with images (and they don’t even know it’s plagiarism). Check out several posts on this site dealing with this issue. To avoid these cases, use these websites to help students find sources they can use and not violate copyrights.

Plagiarism Resource: Hosting Facts

Teachers (and other academic integrity enthusiasts!),

Here’s a helpful source : hosting facts.

It’s another great site with lots of plagiarism education and detection tools. Of special note is the way the site helps to distinguish between plagiarism and copyright infringement, involves an infographic with a timeline of U.S. copyright history, and covers some of the major free online tools for detecting plagiarism.

Check it out!

 

Combatting Plagiarism With Handwriting

Here is an interesting article about combatting plagiarism through handwritten assignments. The article gives an interesting perspective on the value of handwriting for promoting originality and “deeper cognition” as students complete their work.

I utilize handwritten assignments in my class often, and have found that it does force students to think through their writing. It is more work on the teacher, however. But, as the article seems to suggest, the pros outweigh the cons.