China Writers Group Gives Out (Ironic) Award for Best Plagiarist

Check out this article: Plagiarism Prize. The article summarises a Northern China writers’ association award for the best plagiarism of the year. Of course, it’s an ironic award, but it once again highlights the rampant problem of plagiarism in the world today. A good (and funny) article to stimulate class discussions.

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A Review of Anti-Plagiarism Practices

It’s the start of another school year, and the fourth year of stopplagiarism.org! My classes are up and going as I am sure many of yours are. At the start of the year, when things are getting crazy, it is easy to overlook the importance of establishing anti-plagiarism classrooms where academic integrity is a foundational principle. Take the time to do so! It will benefit you in the long run. Here’s a great website with a quick summary of some great practices you can implement in your classrooms:

My favorite tips (some of which I have seen for the first time) are these: Education World: Put an End to Plagiarism in Your Classrooms

  • Don’t simply assign a paper and wait for the final version. Set deadlines for research notes and bibliographies, for outlines, and for rough drafts. Check the work in progress
  • Explain to students that you will check any questionable sources or uncited material. Tell them to keep their notes and printed Web pages until they’ve received their final grades.
  • Require that students submit a signed “letter of transmittal” with their reports. In the letter, have them reflect on the research and writing process and explain what they learned.
  • Avoid assigning general topics for research papers. Papers geared toward narrow topics specific to your own curriculum are less likely to be available online. Make your assigned topics as interesting as possible, so students will be more likely to want to do the work themselves.

Check out the other tips on the website, and, good luck this year in establishing plagiarism-free classes!

 

 

Plagiarism, Yes or No?

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One of the best ways to help students understand plagiarism is to put the question to them. This week, there were two interesting plagiarism accusations. The first was made against a photo entered into the Sony World Photo Awards. The second was made against  the heavy metal band Metallica for their recent song “Moth Into Flame.” Check out the cases and have your students consider whether or not the plagiarism accusation was warranted. I think you will have a really great discussion.

Plagiarism Resource: Hosting Facts

Teachers (and other academic integrity enthusiasts!),

Here’s a helpful source : hosting facts.

It’s another great site with lots of plagiarism education and detection tools. Of special note is the way the site helps to distinguish between plagiarism and copyright infringement, involves an infographic with a timeline of U.S. copyright history, and covers some of the major free online tools for detecting plagiarism.

Check it out!

 

Powerpoint Presentation: Originality vs. Innovation

So, I created this presentation for a PD session I did in an attempt to provide an example for plagiarism education. I encouraged the teachers in the session to see it as an example of how to teach students about the issues around plagiarism.

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Check it out.

New York Times Plagiarism Education

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Here’s a great website I found care of “The Learning Network” from The New York Times:New York Times Learning Network: Plagiarism Education

The site has all sorts of lesson plans, tools, tips, videos, and more that can help you instruct your students about plagiarism. As they put it, “The middle and high school years are an opportunity to shape healthy attitudes in a lower-stakes environment. But for many students, poor habits are formed ahead of college.” This website can help you instruct your middle school and high school students in the good habits of avoiding plagiarism.

What is Original?

A great, great, great discussion about originality in the world today (music, fashion, technology, etc.) from the folks at TED.

Of particular importance is how (or if) originality can be achieved in today’s world. My view is that students need to learn how to use prior sources and ideas to build upon. That is their original contribution.

Here’s the podcast: What is Original?