Plagiarism Resources for the International Baccalaureate

Many of the teachers that come to this site teach in an International Baccalaureate (or IB) school. The IB has rigorous academic honesty policies for their classes. For example, all IB teachers must sign off on the originality of each of their students work. For this post, I have collected a couple of IB resources that discuss effective practices and principles to utilize in your classrooms to encourage academic honesty. By no means are these documents limited to IB teachers, all teachers should find them useful.

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New York Times Plagiarism Education

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Here’s a great website I found care of “The Learning Network” from The New York Times:New York Times Learning Network: Plagiarism Education

The site has all sorts of lesson plans, tools, tips, videos, and more that can help you instruct your students about plagiarism. As they put it, “The middle and high school years are an opportunity to shape healthy attitudes in a lower-stakes environment. But for many students, poor habits are formed ahead of college.” This website can help you instruct your middle school and high school students in the good habits of avoiding plagiarism.

What is Original?

A great, great, great discussion about originality in the world today (music, fashion, technology, etc.) from the folks at TED.

Of particular importance is how (or if) originality can be achieved in today’s world. My view is that students need to learn how to use prior sources and ideas to build upon. That is their original contribution.

Here’s the podcast: What is Original?

Creating Lessons that Discourage Plagiarism

One of the best things a teacher can do is to create a classroom environment that discourages AND DECREASES the temptation to commit plagiarism. Using plagiarism checking software is a must (just like a police officers presence decreases speeding on the road), but anti-plagiarism friendly assignments also are great. They turn your classroom into an anti-plagiarism environment while at the same time promoting creative and original thinking. Win-win!

Here’s a helpful link from MIT’s Comparative Media Studies and Writing department that offers teachers suggestions about how to create assignments that decrease the temptation to cheat: Resources for Teachers: How to Prevent Plagiarism

Good luck on the new school year!