End of the Year 2019-2020

It’s the end of the school year, and I am sure all teachers out there are wrapping up with their final requirements before summer. Stopplagiarism.org will be back next year revamped and ready to go as more of a one-stop place for plagiarism tools and resources. However, all the information over the last five years will still be cataloged on the site. Until then, check out all the tips about how to prevent plagiarism in your classrooms in the posts below.

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Plagiarism Flow Chart

Check out this handy dandy plagiarism flow chart. I used it in class recently. It definitely helped my students thinking about when to cite and avoiding any plagiarism issues in their work. The chart is from a really good site on plagiarism and the IB Extended Essay.

 

Stuff You Should Know Does Plagiarism

Stuff You Should Know has always been one of my favorite podcasts. Its a go-to for interesting information about a huge number of subjects. The hosts, Josh and Chuck, are engaging, interesting, and fun as they go through the subject of the podcast.

Along with the podcast, the website has a variety of articles on even more topics. It’s really great. Recently, they turned their attention to plagiarism in an article entitled “The Ethics (and Crime) of Plagiarism .” It’s a great piece of writing that gives info (much of which has been covered in monthly posts below) about plagiarism that is worth sharing with students or even putting up on your class website. Check out both the article and the podcast; they are great teacher tools! See you next month!

Plagiarism.Org

Here’s a great site that includes all sorts of information (similar to this one!) for teachers. I especially like their videos. There’s lots to explore, but what I’ve found so far is that most the videos are for educators, specifically, how to educate students about plagiarism. Check it out and let me know what you think.

Mid-Year Reinforcement: Plagiarism Tutorial and Test by Indiana University

Here is a great resource from Indiana University. The website provides tutorials and practice tests that students can independently complete that teaches them about plagiarism issues and how to avoid it. At the end, there’s a test that they can complete that gives evidence of their training and new knowledge.

I really like this site because it allows students practice before providing proof of plagiarism training (in the form of a passed test). I had my students complete the test and placed the results in their file. That way, no student can claim ignorance about plagiarism. Completing this website along with the Harvard Plagiarism training at the beginning of the year gives a nice beginning and mid-year training program.

Detecting Plagiarism

Hello All and Welcome to 2019!

It’s not enough for a teacher to rely on a plagiarism checker. They need to have a working knowledge of plagiarism and what constitutes committing plagiarism. This knowledge, of course, should be share with their students throughout the year (not just at the beginning!). With that in mind, as we start the new year, I wanted to give a couple of sources that review warning signs for plagiarism. This article by teachthought.com lists the signs of plagiarism that every teacher should know. Another from MIT lists warning signs and “the enemy” of academic integrity.

Share these sites with your students as you go over your plagiarism policies at the start of a new calendar year. Let them know that they won’t be able to get away with plagiarism so easily. That’s the way to create a temptation free classroom!

Stopplagiarism.org is STREAMLINED!

Hey all, it’s been almost four years since this site got off the ground. I hope it has helped out in your fight against student plagiarism. Because there are so many posts, I took time this week to streamline the site. Now, you will be able to search the site based on categories and tags so that you can get all the information you need quickly without having to look through the whole thing!